Home ARCHITECTURE Styles

Shingle Victorian House (1880-1900)

Reference: A Field Guide to American Houses, Virginia & Lee McAlester, 1984)

Shingle style aims for the effect of a complex shape enclosed within a smooth surface (the shingled exterior), which unifies the irregular outline of the house. This style is from the Medieval tradition of architecture. Most variants and details are designed to enhance either the irregularity of the shape or the uniformity of its surface. Towers are more likely to appear as partial bulges or as half-towers rather than as fully developed elements. Porch supports are most commonly either slender, unadorned wooden posts or massive piers of stone or shingle cladding. Palladian windows and simple classical columns, both borrowed from the contemporaneous early phases of the Colonial Revival, are the most common decorative details.

“Wall cladding and roofing of continuous wood shingles (shingled walls may occur on second store only; original wooden roofing, . . . asymmetrical façade with irregular, steeply pitched roof line; roofs usually have intersection cross gables and multi-level eaves; commonly with extensive porches. . . “

John Barber White, the prominent Kansas City lumberman and philanthropist built 616 E. 36th Street in 1892.

616 E. 36th Street
616 East 36th Street

3303 Harrison Street
3303 Harrison Street

419 E. 36th Street
419 E. 36th Street

48 Janssen Place
48 Janssen Place

3541 Charlotte Street
3535 Charlotte St.

3632 Locust Street
3632 Locust St.