Home ARCHITECTURE Styles

Colonial Revival Eclectic House (1880-1995)

Reference: A Field Guide to American Houses, Virginia & Lee McAlester, 1984

Colonial Revival style falls under the Renaissance Classical tradition. It “refers to the entire rebirth of interest in the early English and Dutch houses of the Atlantic seaboard. The Georgian and Adam styles form the backbone of the Revival, with secondary influences form Postmedieval English or Dutch Colonial prototypes. Details form two or more of these precedents are freely combined in many examples so that pure copies of colonial houses are far less common than are eclectic mixtures.” The principal areas of elaboration are entrances, cornices, and windows. The front entrance is normally accentuated with a decorative crown supported by pilasters, or extended forward and supported by slender columns to form an entry porch. Doors commonly have overhead fanlights or sidelights. The facades are normally symmetrically balanced with center door. The subtypes include Georgian, Adam, and Dutch.

Original Georgian houses had paneled front doors that are usually centered and capped by an elaborate decorative crown supported by decorative pilasters. Original Adam houses have few elaborations other than the fanlight and accentuated front door, which often includes an entry porch. Palladian-style windows are common. Dutch houses are identified by their gambrel roof.

Colonial Revival

500 E. 36th Street
500 E. 36th Street
Built in 1909
Designed by Lewis Curtis.

3525 Harrison Street
3525 Harrison Blvd.
Built in 1908
Designed by Shepard & Farrar.

715 Manheim Rd.
715 Manheim Road
Built in 1920


Dutch Colonial

3541 Charlotte Street
3541 Charlotte Street

3605 Gillham Road
3605 Gillham Road

3724 Holmes Street
3724 Holmes Street

4012 Charlotte Street
4012 Charlotte Street