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2 Janssen Place

2 Janssen Place

The third house to be built on Janssen Place is this Italianate Revival constructed in 1905. Built for John Henry Tschudy, his wife Anna, and their six children, the home was designed by the architectural firm of Howe, Hoit and Cutler. The family business, the J.H. Tschudy Hardwood Lumber Company, was located as 23rd and West Pennway for many years. Members of the Tschudy family occupied the house until 1947. The decades following saw the house and carriage house subdivided into as many as eleven separate rental units.

The ninth owner bought the house in 1985 and started restoration. As one would expect in a house built by the owner of a hardwood lumber company, the interior woodwork includes eleven different woods. The house contains eighteen-rooms, over fifty original or period light fixtures. The second and third floors include seven bedrooms and four bathrooms. Other rooms on the upper floors include a sitting room, billiard room and small kitchen.



17 Janssen Place

17 Janssen Place

This Jacobethan Revival was built in 1912-3 for Abram Rosenberger. Mr. Rosenberger was associated with the H.M. Jones Distillery Co. The multi-paned windows are in multiple groups. The front is dominated by a massive, multiple fluted, very tall chimney. Notice the stone balustrades on the terrace and upper story.



42 Janssen Place

42 Janssen Place

Joseph M. Bernardin was one of several lumbermen to build on Janssen Place, and his 1910 Neo-Georgian Colonial Revival style house gives ample evidence of his trade. Different woods set the theme for each room: cherry in the dining room, burled fir in the kitchen, oak in the entry hall and mahogany in the living room. The majestic treatment does not carry over to fireplaces, as the living room hearth with its nine foot mahogany mantel and original brass fixtures, is surprisingly, the only one in the house. The dominant impression of the house is one of spaciousness as exemplified by the more than ample entry and living room. An exceptional stained glass window that has been featured in national publications dominates the second floor landing, which is large enough to double as a family rec room. All the second floor rooms interconnect, and each of the bathrooms contains original stained and beveled glass.



48 Janssen Place

48 Janssen Place

The native cut rubble stone and slate shingle home located at #48 Janssen Place was built in 1900, the second home on the street. The first resident was Burton C. Hurd, president of the Joseph OLeary Machinery Company. Outstanding original features of the home include abundant woodwork and beautiful beveled, leaded glass windows. The original carriage house has been converted (1991) to a contemporary one-bedroom apartment. A new three-car garage on the southwest corner of the property was added in 1991.



53 Janssen Place

53 Janssen Place

Constructed n 1913-14, this house is a Mediterranean-style brick mansion with Italian Renaissance, Spanish Eclectic and Mission influences. It retains its original green Spanish-style clay tile roof by the Ludowici Company. It was the 18th of the original 19 houses (all of which are still standing) built on this exclusive street.

Granville M. Smith and his family were the builders and first occupants of #53 Janssen Place. The buildings permit for the house, which occupies two lots (150 wide x 280 deep) called for expenditures of $23,000, a very considerable sum in 1913. Bert L. Elmer constructed the large house for the Smiths based on architecture plans by the firm of Keene & Simpson. This architectural firm also designed the landmark Scottish Rite Temple at Linwood and The Paseo, which is a few blocks northeast of Janssen Place.

Mr. Smith was a bankerat one time President and Chairman of the Board of the old Commonwealth National Bank. An economic recession in 1922 caught Mr. Smith overextended and resulted in the Smith familys sale of their Janssen Place home. The buyer was Jerome Bray, then manager of the now demolished Dixon House Hotel, and later associated with the Phillips Hotel, each in downtown Kansas City. The Brays owned the house until early 1932 when it was sold to Mr. and Mrs. James R. Swofford. Less than six months later, in August of 1932, the Swoffords conveyed the house to longtime owners the Schneider family.

William B. Schneider owned and occupied the house from 1932 to 1951. It is believed that the Schneiders installed the house's elevator (one of the first in a residence in Kansas City) and erected the long concrete ramp between the rear of the house and its carriage house to assist with the care of a disabled child. Mrs. Schneider died in 1950 and Mr. Schneider soon thereafter in 1951.

In 1951, shortly after their fathers death, the Schneider children sold the house to Dr. Clarence Roy McCubbin and his wife, Fay Ann. Mrs. McCubbin was a well-known local golfer who won many tournaments. Dr. McCubbin was a leading anesthesiologist at nearby St. Marys Hospital. The McCubbins, who had no children, owned the house until 1962 when it was sold to a couple who tried, unsuccessfully, after legal action by other Janssen Place owners, to convert it into a nursing home.

In the mid 1960s, 53 Janssen Place was purchased by a non-resident landlord who converted it into an apartment house and refused to sell it for over 30 years despite many offers. Finally in 1999, the house was purchased by two investors who did initial clean up and some basic improvements and within a year sold it.



54 Janssen Place

54 Janssen Place

The wonderful 10,000 square foot home at 54 Janssen Place was built for John. W. Jenkins, president of the J.W. Jenkins and Sons Music Company in 1916-17. The Georgian Revival stone house was designed by the prestigious Shepard, Farrar and Wiser architectural firm and built by the Long Construction Company. The house has many distinctive exterior architectural features. Quions define the corners of the house; the three dormers are pedimented and have decorative railings; the front door is encased in an elliptical fanlight and sidelights; the entrance portico has stone baluster trim; modillions and brackets define the eaves; and segmented-arched architraves top the windows. When the house was purchased in 1977, it contained several apartments. Outstanding features of the interior are the wood paneled library, the stained glass windows in the dining room, which matche the windows in the pocket doors, and the stained glass window on the stairway landing.



66 Janssen Place

66 Janssen Place

The architectural firm of Smith, Rea & Hovitt, designed number 66 Janssen Place. T.E. Smith built it in 1912-13 for Edward L. Foutch, vice-president of the B-R Electric & Telephone Manufacturing Company. Smith, Rea & Hovitt also designed the Ararat Shire Building at 300 11th Street, The Kansas City Club at 1228 Baltimore and the Firestone Building at 2001 Grand Avenue. This 2 1/2-story residence is constructed of masonry and wood in Jacobean revival style. It has an irregular L-shaped plan with asymmetrically designed facades, dormers and chimneys. Exterior walls are three bays wide. Secondary entrances are situated on the north, south and rear. Cut stone frames windows and is used for quoins, coping and balustrades. Projecting eaves have exposed rafters or brackets. Interior features include first floor oak and walnut wood and outstanding beveled and cut-glass throughout.



67 Janssen Place

67 Janssen Place

Designed by the architectural firm of Shepard, Farrar and Wiser, #67 Janssen Place is more reflective of the sure hand and personality of the firm that designed it than any particular architectural style. Note the perfect symmetry of the exterior, the large, vaguely Doric columns embellished with brackets supporting the front porch, and the continuous horizontal dormer across the front of the house. The exterior is modest but stately, a combination of stucco and Missouri field stone.

John M. Byrne of the J.M. BYRNE LUMBER COMPANY, located at 1701 Wyandotte, erected the house in 1912. John lived in the house directly south of #67, and there is some speculation that 67 Janssen Place was built as a wedding present, since its first occupant was his son Ralph. When the home was built, the citys streetcar lines stopped at 31st and Main, making a horse and buggy, car or good legs a necessity to live here. In 1915, Thomas Y. Willock, president of Willock Realty and Loan, the company that assembled the properties to create the site for the Jackson county courthouse, purchased the home. In 1939 or 1940, the house was sold to Dr. Robert E. Menees and his wife, Vivian Cowgill Menees. During their long tenure, they added the first floor powder room, and the curved Italian marble patio, with its fountain and serpentine wall.

Number 67 and its neighbor to the south have similar motifs in the interior millwork and staircase design since both were built for the Byrne family. The first floor woodwork is all in its original condition. Floors throughout the first and second floors are one and one-quarter inch quarter-sawn oak. The woodwork and stairwell in the foyer are oak, while the dining and living rooms are cherry. For being built in 1912, the design of the interior is surprisingly modern. The oversized, almost picture windows and sleekness in the design of the woodwork, and massive clean lined mantel typify this. Exceptions to this, however, are the English casement windows with diamond leaded glass in the foyer, dining room, and second floor master bath.

The home was originally built as 12-plus rooms with three and one-half baths, and measures roughly 4,000 square feet. A second wood-burning fireplace in the master bedroom, Jacuzzi, steam bath, and sauna were added. In the 1970s the kitchen was completely gutted and remodeled. The original pine cabinets were refinished and retained, with other custom-made cabinets added.



80 Janssen Place

80 Janssen Place 80 Janssen Place

The grand house at 80 Janssen Place is built in the Georgian Colonial Revival style, impressive in its symmetry and solidity. The buff-colored bricks are set in very fine mortar joints and the house is ornamented with distinctive window surrounds, wrought iron balconies and bronze detailing that includes exterior lamps, the front door and ageless entrance canopy. The house was built in 1912-13 for Mrs. A.H. Glasner, a widow and the vice President of Glasner and Barzen Distilling Company. She shared the house with her divorced daughter, Bertha E. Glasner, and her granddaughter, Louise. The elder Mrs. Glasner collected fine art and her walls were hung with works by Renoir, w\Whistler, Bellows and LeSidaner.

When Mrs. Glasner built her home on Janssen Place, she wanted the best of everything. The cost of the house, with more than 6,500 square feet of floor space, was approximately $70,000. All first floor rooms have hardwood floors and Honduran mahogany woodwork. The living room fireplace mantel is carved of white marble and dark green marble surrounds the library fireplace. A large stained glass window lights the second floor landing. A glass-enclosed solarium with red tile floor and fireplace is located at the south end of the house. The three stories of the house contain 23 rooms, six bedrooms, two sleeping porches and four fireplaces. The third floor originally housed living quarters for the family chauffeur and his wife, the households cook and housekeeper.

The prominent Glasner family lived here until the late 1930s. The house then had a number of owners until 1973, when George and Mary Tucker purchased it. George Tucker often walked through Janssen Place on his way to Westport High School and was determined to live there someday. The Tuckers were part of the initial group of urban pioneers who moved to Hyde Park n the 1970s to begin renovation of the magnificent old homes.



96 Janssen Place

96 Janssen Place

This wonderful 8,000 square foot Georgian Colonial Revival home was built for lumberman W.C. and Katherine Bowman in 1911. The house was designed by Shepard, Farrar & Wiser. So solid is the house that fortress may be a more appropriate term than mansion. Nineteen cast-iron pillars are arranged along the front porch. Criss-cross steel trusses support the partially concrete first floor, wiring is placed in rigid conduit, and a four-foot deep gravel drainage field underlies the foundation. True to the colonial style, the house does not contain the ornate embellishment of other Janssen Place homes. However, the size of the rooms lends grandeur of their own. The first floor rooms are huge, and even the second floor hallway measures 12 by 28. There are a total of seven bedrooms, four bathrooms, and five fireplaces. All wood trim in the house, including the basement, is mahogany, but one of the nicest touches can be easily overlooked. The doorknobs are brass and milk glass with keys to match every lock. The Janssen Place address was a prestigious one until the 1950s, when the area declined and many of the magnificent mansions, including this one, were converted into apartments. In 1986 a fire damaged the third floor.