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3437 Holmes Street

3437 Holmes Street

This home displays a low-pitched, hipped roof with wide overhanging eaves. The entrance is on the side through a large, pillared L shaped porch. The original structure was built in 1916, with the rear additions occurring in 1953.



3519 Holmes Street

3519 Holmes Street

In 1904, when well-known attorney Cyrus S. Crane built this house, it was one of the first on the block. Mr. Crane, who was born in 1867 in Connecticut and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas in 1887, came to Kansas City to read law. He started with the law firm of Lathrop, Morrow, Fox & Moore in 1888 and was unanimously elected President of the Kansas City Bar Association in 1924. Considered by many to be one of the best trial attorneys in Kansas City, Mr. Crane lived in this house until his death in the early 1950s. His daughter stayed in the house until the 1960s.

This stone and frame two and a half story house is a variation on the shirtwaist style, popular in the early part of this century in Kansas City. All of the woodwork on the first floor is oak, including the distinctive fireplace mantel in the living room. The southwest window in the southwest corner of the living room has a musical motif, probably chosen in honor of Mrs. Crane, a well-known opera singer. When the house was on the Hyde Park homes tour in 1992, part of Cyrus Crane’s law book collection was still in the oak bookcases in the living room and the Crane family’s dining room table, chairs, and breakfront was still in the house.



3521 Holmes Street

3521 Holmes Street

This 4,000 square foot French Eclectic house was constructed by Louis and Anna Knoche Tippe in 1907. The slate hipped roof dominates a symmetrical façade with centrally placed entrance portico supported by columns. Fenestrations consist of double-hung windows adorned with skewback stone lintels, with keystones and stone lugsills. A modified Palladian window is centrally placed over the entrance. The roof is enhanced by an elaborate cornice and centrally placed pedimented dormer with volute buttresses, a renaissance detail borrowed from the Beaux Arts movement. Copper circular dormers with Oeil de Boeuf (bulls eye) windows flank the central dormer. The house was used as a commune in the 1960s and 70’s.



3615 Holmes Street

3615 Holmes Street

This shingle style residence with secondary Swiss influence was constructed in 1897. The asymmetrical façade is dominated by a fish-scale shingled full front-gable with decorative false brackets. The stone first story is enhanced by a multi-sided bay window typical of the shingle style, which does not emphasize decorative detailing but aims for complexity of shape. In the 1980s a carriage house was designed to emulate the existing house. Hyde Park lore has it that this residence was constructed for the Swiss grandmother of the family, which built a substantial home on the adjacent north lot which burned years ago.



3616 Holmes Street

3616 Holmes Street

Construction of this brick, two and a half story, tiled roof Colonial Revival home was begun in the fall of 1912 by the C.E. Ennis Construction Company and the house was ready for occupancy in June 1913. The construction cost $10,000. A tile side-gabled roof, with three big dormers, dominates a symmetrical façade with centrally placed entrance portico, which covers the decorative leaded glass entrance door flanked by leaded glass sidelights.

Robert R. Smith and his wife Sally lived in the house for the next twenty years. Mr. Smith was the Director of the Modern Woodmen of America, a trade organization. Widow Ethel J. Whilhoit bought the house in the early 1940s and lived here for almost the next forty years with her daughter Virginia, a teacher at Faxon Elementary School. During Mrs. Wilhoit’s tenure the property served as a boarding house, at one time sheltering forty to fifty servicemen.

Although the house had been neglected and “remuddled”, much of the original architectural detail remained. The center hall plan home features a large living room with dentil crown moldings, fireplace, and French doors opening to a year-round sun porch. The stained and leaded glass windows in the dining room are original as is the built-in mahogany buffet. The light fixtures in both the living room and dining room are also original to the house.



3624 Holmes Street

3624 Holmes Street

Charles Heinz built the frame and brick Tudor at 3624 Holmes in 1908 for Mason L. Dean. When the house was purchased nearly 70 years later, the unique exterior, with its stained and beveled glass windows were the only signs of its earlier grandeur. The home had been chopped up into five apartments, and the previous owner had started de-converting the home by tearing out walls. The first floor had no kitchen and was unlivable. The first floor painted woodwork was completely stripped and re-painted as originally intended. Crown molding in the living room had to be specially milled and fireplace tiles were replaced with marble.



3628 Holmes Street

3628 Holmes Street

The 1907 American Foursquare house was built in 1907 for one of William Rockhill Nelson’s lawyers. Prior to restoration back to a single-family, it had been converted into five apartments. Period touches of crown molding in the dining room mantel pieces (a basement find), French doors and hardwood floors remain.



3644 Holmes Street

3644 Holmes Street

Architects Herman Stroeh and George Kelly for Stewart Taylor built this craftsman home with half-timber detailing in 1906. The house features excellent oak and mahogany woodwork and large columns in the open entryway. Oak and maple floors run throughout the first and second floors.



3700 Holmes Street

3700 Holmes Street

Eugene Lyons, vice president for Lyons Millinery Company, was the first owner of 3700 Holmes. Benjamin Lubschez designed this house in 1915. This typical American Foursquare house has a big inviting front porch.



3703 Holmes Street

3703 Holmes Street

Built in 1907 for Mr. J. Lincoln, this is a typical shirtwaist.



3707 Holmes Street

3707 Holmes Street

Designed by architect Shelby Kurfiss, the construction of this brick, half-timbered and stucco home was announced in the Kansas City Times on Saturday, May 8, 1909. George W. Lincoln, District Passenger Agent for the Chicago Great Western Railway, built the home for about $8,000 but resided there only two years. By 1912 Mr. Lincoln had changed his occupation to “builder” and was living down the block in another home he built—3718 Holmes. Two years later Mr. Lincoln was at yet another address. Some records indicate that this Mr. Lincoln may also have built the house next door to the north at 3703 Holmes. The two and a half story home features an unusual side entrance on the northwest corner of the house and is one of only two homes in Hyde Park constructed with black brick. Inside, the living room, dining room, and stairway feature oak woodwork. An arched doorway completes with French doors between the living room and music room.



3724 Holmes Street

3724 Holmes Street

Constructed in 1924, this home was a late addition to central Hyde Park, where most homes were built prior to World War I. This attractive home in the Colonial Revival architectural style has a Gambrel/Dutch or “Barn” roof design. The garage/carriage house is of similar style. There is a wide porte-cochere on the north side of the house, which provides symmetry for the south porch, both of which originally had decorative wood railings. The west 73 feet of the house’s 208 feet deep lot is a part of the Janssen Place subdivision and was carved out of the rear of then undeveloped lots. Gifted Kansas City architect Victor J. Defoe designed the house. He is best know for his prairie school houses in the historic Westheight District of Kansas City, Kansas. The house, which overlooks part of the historic Santa Fe Trail along Harrison Parkway, was built for Nathaniel B. Terrill and his wife, Emma. A set of the home’s 1924 blueprints as well as an original Abstract, or land ownership record, for the home’s lot area from the 1835 land patent from the State of Missouri exist with the house.



3863 Holmes Street

3836 Holmes Street

After finishing a twelve-year “internship” with the renowned New York City architectural firm of McKim Mead and White, Thomas Wight had offers from four cities—Cleveland, Toronto, New York and Kansas City. Luckily for Kansas Citians, he chose our city, and in 1904 joined with Edward Wilder to form the firm Wilder & Wight. Thomas’ first architectural job in Kansas City was the design and construction of the First National Bank Building at Tenth and Baltimore. In 1910, Thomas Wight’s younger brother William completed his internship with McKim Mead and White and bought out Edward Wilder to form Wight & Wight. The list of buildings designed by the firm includes the Nelson Art Gallery, City Hall, Police Headquarters, Jackson County Courthouse (exterior), Linda Hall Library, and the Kansas City Life Building. By the time Thomas Wight designed and built this house in 1908, his family included his wife, Grace Sheridan Wight, and two daughters, Helen (two) and Dorothy (one). Grace Wight was a well-known local philanthropist and founded what is known today as the Minute Circle-Friendly House in memory of her daughter Marjorie, who died at the age of five in 1917. Following Thomas’ death from a heart attack on September 6, 1949, Grace sold the house and moved to the Walnuts. Although never subdivided into apartments, the following years were not kind and the house suffered form neglect and required extensive renovation. Interior features include oak woodwork, pocket doors, a cherry wood staircase, art glass, and fireplace mantels.



3926 Holmes Street

3926 Holmes Street

This Tudor-influenced shirtwaist was built in 1909. In the mid-1950s the owner who wanted to show enough income to adopt a child converted the house into three apartments. After they moved, a series of absentee owners left the house in a state of disrepair. A development company bought the property as a foreclosure from the bank. An employee of the company convinced them to take out a wall addition between the dining room and the front of the house. This opened the space and made such a radical change in the ‘feel’ of the house that she decided to purchase it. The interior oak stairway, which had been converted into a closet, was reclaimed after removing an obstructing wall. The interior is strongly influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, and oak woodwork is incorporated extensively throughout the first floor. Distinctive architectural features include two window seats, a recessed oak-trimmed leaded glass window, oak plate rail, and beamed ceilings.



4021 Holmes Street

4021 Holmes Street

American homebuilding changed dramatically during the period 1865 through 1900, often referred to as the “High Victorian” era. Home pattern books featuring floor plans and stock-milled house parts became widely available across the country and home ownership became a reality for the growing middle class. The simple gable-fronted Homestead style (or temple-form) home such as 4021 Holmes became a common architectural style.

Plat maps published in 1891 verify that this house and its two neighborhoods to the north were already in place by 1890. City directory records indicate that members of the same family at the turn-of-the-century originally owned these three houses: the last surviving family member, Clara Bastman of 4013 Holmes, died in the 1970s. 4021 Holmes was occupied by architect George Bastman and his wife Elizabeth from 1912 until 1950. It is interesting to note that the house was not connected to city water until 1950; it appears that it was connected then only to make the property saleable following the death of Elizabeth that year. Over the next thirty years the homes changed hands frequently. Original features include bulls-eye trim framing the doors and windows and matching stained glass windows in the front door and window.



4033 Holmes Street

4033 Holmes Street

Oscar Peterson served as architect and builder for this, his only home in Kansas City. Constructed during the sprig of 1911, the house was built as a one-story bungalow with only a single room at the back on the second floor—a popular Kansas City style commonly referred to as the airplane bungalow. Peterson, a carpenter, graced his home with Craftsman-style architectural details popular at the time: oak woodwork including a boot bench in the entry hall, vertical window muntins, beveled glass in the oak front door and sidelights, and a built-in china cabinet and box beam ceiling in the large dining room.

In 1925, Peterson added a second floor-sleeping porch and remodeled the unfinished attic portion of the house to create rentable space. The stairs that led from the first floor to the single room on the second floor were closed-in and an outside staircase was built for access to the second floor. The house was changed to a duplex; it remains in that form today (1997). Oscar Peterson lived in this house until his death in the 1950s; his window Lottie continued to live in the house until her death in the mid-1960s.



4034 Holmes Street

4034 Holmes Street

This Craftsman Cottage house, along with the two bungalows located at 4030 and 4032 Holmes, were built in 1911 for speculation by H.L. Lartner. Construction costs of $3,600 produced this stucco and wood shingle house. Nine years, later, the sleeping porch was added for $400. Charles Southwell and his son, George Lee, first purchased the home. Southwell was a clerk in his father’s music publishing company, which printed music for bands and orchestras of the era. Original features throughout the home include the fireplace and tile surround, built-in window seat with bookcase and claw-foot tub.



4111 Holmes Street

4111 Holmes Street

This two-story clapboard house clearly shows that beautiful big-home features are prevalent in smaller homes. In fact, Hyde Park boasts one of the city’s largest selections of bungalow. This house was built in 1911 for grocer Edmond Smee and his wife, Mona, a typist for BF Goodrich Rubber Company. The home features a sterling silver based chandelier in the dining room and built-in bookcases, oak pillars and a gas fireplace with keystone hearth in the living room.



4225 Holmes Street

4225 Holmes Street

This one-story bungalow residence was built in 1916 by Hucks and Sexton for Frank P. Muehlbach at the cost of $2,500. Mr. Muehlbach built this house along with the one next door (4223) and others on this block probably for speculation. The first person listed at this address in the city directories was Carl Rollert, a salesman who occupied the home in 1920. The William V. Carter family purchased this residence in1937. Mrs. Carter was widowed in1946 but remained in the home with her seven children until 1970. When the wallpaper was removed, the names of the children were found on the walls. This house is a fine example of the bungalow style of architecture with its low and simple lines, wide projecting roof and porch set off to one side of the front. The porch roof echoes the gable roof of the house.



4233 Holmes Street

4233 Holmes Street

This one-story bungalow style residence wa constructed in 1911 by Henry Ostrom for speculation by the Phillips Realty Co. At the same time Mr. Ostrom also built 4231 and 4235 Holmes for the Phillips Realty Co. The first person listed as having resided at this address (in 1917) was Frederick Strauss, an assistant chief clerk for the Union Pacific Railroad. This residence and the others along the same side of the street form a homogeneous streetscape of bungalows. Most of the bungalows were built in the early 1990's and their popularity reached a peak around 1920.