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3303 Harrison Street

3303 Harrison Street

This Princess Anne-style mansion was built in 1889 for lawyer John Eaton and his family. When it was purchased in 1981, it was on the dangerous building list, had been empty for two years and was heaped full of trash—inside and out. The building had housed 12 apartments and the oak floors had been painted different colors to match the rooms. During the restoration a pair of women’s high top shoes and an 1883 edition of the Old Testament in Swedish was found. Two staircases had to be rebuilt and fireplaces that had been bricked up reopened.



3310 Harrison Street

3310 Harrison Street

This impressive home was built in 1890 for William Barton, president of the Barton Hat Company and president of the Commercial Club in 1897-98. His family lived at 3310 Harrison until shortly after Mr. Barton died in 1917. From 1919 until the house was purchased in 1981, the dwelling was owned by a succession of enterprising occupants. The first was Orval Cunningham, who operated Cunningham Sanitarium on the premises from 1920 until 1930. In the backyard he constructed a cylindrical tank—10 feet in diameter and nearly 90 feet long, equipped with air lock toilets, shower baths and Pullman car sleeping berths. His “tank treatment” used compressed air (oxygenation) to treat various diseases. Several owners from 1930-1974 rented as many as 26 apartments to others. The Rev. Darrel W. Pringle purchased the property in 1974. His “Pringle Spiritual House” was a boarding home for retired veterans. Mr. Pringle lived at 3310 Harrison until 1981.
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Classical detailing can be seen in the pedimented gable supported by Doric columns, which is located over the porch and also in the Palladian window located in the east gable on the third floor. Carved wood medallions and entablature run along the roofline of the porch. Oak, cheery and mahogany woodwork run throughout the house. In the dining room, a hand carved floor-to-ceiling oak buffet is in its original condition with its Italian Renaissance style being repeated in the fireplace mantel. The newel post of the grand staircase has the pineapple motif, a symbol of hospitality. The landing windows were originally stained glass, and all floors are maple, oak and cherry. Not only is the home graced with unique woodcarvings, but is has interesting bathrooms, too, with hand painted tile on the walls. The main bathroom contained a six-foot bathtub and a sink of marble and nickel-plated brass. And because the original owners held their maid in high esteem, she had her own bathroom. The house contains 6 fireplaces, each with original mantels. In the basement is a full sized billiard room complete with guest bathroom.



3315 Harrison Street

3315 Harrison Street

This Queen Anne house of approximately 6,000 square feet was built in 1889 for John D. Sietz, a partner of the grain commission firm of Lee & Sietz. Architect M. A. Diaz, who was also an architect for the school board during the late 1800s, designed the house. The home was originally designed for entertaining and boasts an unusually open floor plan with lobbies for music and dancing on both the first and second floors. The house became a boarding house in the 1920s, and at one time, contained as many as 13 apartments, including a two-story addition on the back of the house, which has been removed. The house has many delightful features. Oak woodwork can be found throughout with the exception of cherry wood in the music room and maple floors in the kitchen. A bull’s-eye motif recurs in the woodwork on the second floor. There are original curved glass exterior windows and rose-colored stain glass windows overlooking the main staircase. At one time, every room on the first floor had an elaborate decorative ceiling molding. Those that remained were restored. Several rooms in the house are interesting to note. A small round room located off the main lobby under the stairs was used as a smoking and waiting room for the Sietz daughter’s suitors. The dining room contains an unusual vaulted barrel ceiling, and there is a domed room on the landing of the main stairway. The house also contains a third floor ballroom with fireplace, a conical-shaped game room, and an authentic wine cellar.



3325 Harrison Street

3325 Harrison Street

This Midwestern “Shirtwaist” with Colonial Revival detailing was finished in 1909. The house was built on a T-shaped strip of land, which included the houses on the east side of Harrison south to 34th Street, along with 3320 Harrison—all of which were built by Cowherd Brothers. Rumor has it that the woman who lived here was a spinster who got married and spent one night in the house before accusing her bridegroom of being an opportunist and giving him the boot. The house sat empty for eight years—condemned, windowless and debris filled. A succession of wintering hobos had used most of the interior trim for firewood (which they burned in the middle of the living room). The plumbing and heating had burst, resulting in a hole from the first floor to the sky. A wall built too high in the basement caused a 3-inch warp in the living room floor.



3328 Harrison Street

3328 Harrison Street

This 6,000 square foot Queen Anne style mansion is one of the grandest homes in all of Hyde Park. E.H. Morgan, who made his money in cowhides, built it in 1896. By the mid-70’s, this house had been divided into 17 apartments. The house with collapsing porches, broken windows and peeling paint was in general disrepair. Restoration back to a single-family home began in the late 1970’s and the two subsequent owners since have done extensive renovation work. The use of many types of wood is a special feature of this house. The first floor is all oak, the second natural walnut with oak and cherry fireplaces, and the third floor pine and mahogany. Other distinctive architectural features include beveled glass doors, a tiled entry, six fireplaces, original brass chandeliers, three different styles of spindles in the main staircase, and elaborate painted ceiling moldings in the parlor, supposedly hiding original ceiling murals. Special care was required to preserve and highlight the exquisite plaster and canvas ceiling in the music room, as well as the tin, wood and plaster ceiling in the dining room.



3331 Harrison Street

3331 Harrison Street

The Cowherd Brothers Construction Company began work on this two and one-half story shirtwaist home in September 1900 and new owners Theodore and Libbie Ackerman moved in sometime in early 1901. Although at the time the house was built Theodore Ackerman was a co-owner of the Millikan-Mullowney Saddlery Company, his interest in following years were centered on real estate and loans. After Theodore’s death in the late teens, his widow Libbie lived in the house another ten years. New owners came and went for the next five decades, subdividing the beautiful home into six apartments. Exterior architectural features of note are the pedimented bellcast gable roof, uncovered rubble limestone first story, with wood shingle second story, exterior brick chimney with stone quoins, a 3-story tripartite bay on the south façade and a cameo window in the apex of the gable on the west façade. Restoration began in 1981 and included removing the asbestos sliding.



3334 Harrison Street

3334 Harrison Street

This stately Queen Anne was built n 1890 for E.F. Swinney, who though in his early thirties, was president of First National Bank of K.C. Swinney had shown promise when he arrived from Texas and took the position of cashier just three years prior. During his long and illustrious life, he became president of The American Bankers Association, served on the board of directors for three companies, and served as treasurer for the board of education for 30 years. He and his wife lived here for about 23 years before moving to 4343 Oak.

When purchased for restoration in 1978, heavy water damage over the years had ruined the plaster and floors in many areas and the house had been divided into 11 apartments. More than 46 cubic years of plaster (some 30 tons) were removed. Doorways and walls were moved. The slate roof, all of the natural woodwork, most of the sculptured plaster and marble pieces from the servant’s sink, as well as the beautiful leaded glass doors were salvaged.



3335 Harrison Street

3335 Harrison Street

In 1887, the Cowherd Brothers, who were active in real estate and development groups of the time, owned seventeen and a half acres of undeveloped land bordered by Troost Avenue, Holmes Street, McCoy Street (now 34th Street) and 33rd Street. The land was platted in 1888 as Highgate and the Cowherds built a number of the homes located in the subdivision. This brick and frame home was built in 1900 on speculation by the cowherds and sold to Anton Weber in March 1901 for $7,400. Mr. Weber, the owner of the largest retail meat market in the state, lived in the home for the next fifteen years. His daughter, Mary, wed Albert Altman of the Altman Jewelry Company.

The next long-term owner was Hattie McKim who rented the house from the Ernest Fluke Realty Company for an annual cost of $900 in 1918. H.D. Lee, founder of the Lee Jeans Company, purchased the house in 1920 although it was Hattie who continued to reside on the property. When Mr. Lee died in March 1928, he left the house and $20,000 to Hattie. She continued to live in the house until her death in 1942.

From the 1940s through the 1970s the residence served as a boarding house. The owners lived on the first floor and rented out rooms on the second and third floors. The house was renovated back to a single family dwelling in the early 1980s. The brick and frame residence has a bellcast hip roof with pedimented gable dormers. The first story is stretcher bond brick and the second, lap board siding. Restoration included removal of a two-inch layer of stucco that completely covered the exterior including porch pillars and opening the enclosed front porch. It took one year of painstakingly chipping off the stucco in 150-pound slabs. The house, rich in architectural detail, includes four sets of oak pocket doors (three in the dining room), oak floors, copper door hardware, bay windows, and period light fixtures. Of particular note is the oak colonnade and kidney-shaped bench in the entry hall.



3505 Harrison Boulevard

3505 Harrison Street

This house is a Vernacular style with Palladian detail. It was built in 1902 for Lynn S. Banks, a ticket agent at the Union Station. The cost was $2,500. In later years it was divided into apartments. When it was purchased in 1979, it had 12 separate apartments/sleeping rooms. There was no kitchen. Arched leaded windows in the stairwell and leaded doors from the living room bookcases had been removed. Even the living room was divided. The tile façade on the living room fireplace had been covered and painted white to look like bricks—every ‘brick’ as outlined and shaded with light blue paint. In fact, that entire side of the living room, including the walnut mantel, had been painted white with blue shadings. All the first floor living room walnut and gum woodwork has had the paint stripped. The lost wainscoting and plate rail in the dining room has been replaced along with the ceiling box beams with the rosette light fixtures.



3525 Harrison Boulevard

3525 Harrison Street

The architectural firm of Shepard and Farrar designed this 2 1/2-story Colonial Revival house. Joe Hellman built it in 1908 fro Mortimer R. Platt, a bank president, owner of a livestock feeding lot, and breeder of Galloway cattle in what is now Leawood, Kansas. Like most Hyde Park homes, this house had been divided into several apartments—seven to be exact. Most of the first floor woodwork had been painted. The dining room beams had been gouged when one owner tried to remove the paint with an auto sander. Restoration began in 1979 with removal of the paint on all the first floor woodwork and three days were spent with a pneumatic orbital sander repairing the dining room beams. Original features include pocket doors and windows wtih beveled and stained glass in the dining room.



3526 Harrison Boulevard

3526 Harrison Street

Designed by the well-known architectural firm of Shepard & Farrar, this stone and stucco modified Colonial Revival home was built in 1910 for prominent attorney Franklin E. Reed, his wife Pearlena, and their two children, Cameron and Frances. Franklin Reed lived in the home until his death in the early 1940s. The following years saw frequent sales of the home and it was eventually subdivided into six apartments.



3620 Harrison Boulevard

3620 Harrison Street

The stone and shingle house with both Colonial Revival and English Tudor characteristics was constructed in 1907 for Robert and Susan Adkins Stone. Robert was secretary of the Stone Brothers Manufacturing Company, which made men's overals, and Susan was the daughter of an early Kansas City postmaster. Subsequent owners prior to World War II included a cattle dealer, the president of a perfume company and a landscape gardener. As was the fate of many large homes in Hyde Park after World War II, 3620 Harrison Boulevard was broken up into apartments. The spacious original dining room was partitioned off into a galley kitchen and bedroom, and its ceiling dropped to hide plumbing for the bathrooms and kitchens added upstairs. Smoe walls and doorways were added or altered, an exterior stairway attached in back and part of the main staircare removed. Prior to the 1952 remodeling, the roof was partialy burned off in a fire. In the subsequent decades, the homeowners usually lived on the first floor while renting out the three apartments on the second and third floors. In 1990 several bedrooms and a bath in the basement were added.

When the has was purchased in 1995, it had been on the market for nearly three years. It contained four kitchens, five full baths and nine bedrooms. The two-car garage, built in 1907, was crowned wiht a deck, which links the second floor balcony with the gardens.



3629 Harrison Boulevard

3629 Harrison Boulevard

This “American Foursquare” house was built for George Goldman in 1909, but clearly its 3rd owner achieved the greatest prominence. Isaac Katz’s life was a Horatio Alger story of a young man who worked his way up from poverty, opened a fruit stand, and then a small store. With his brother Michael, he later developed the Katz Drug Co. into a major regional chain. Their bewhiskered trademark was well known to Kansas Citians until the company became part of Skaggs Drug Centers and then Osco Drug Stores. Unfortunately, the Katz home followed the opposite course of that successful business. At some point after World War II, it was converted to nine or ten apartments. Later it was deconverted and stripped of most of its beveled and stained glass and light fixtures. When it was purchased for restoration in 1974, the grass stood at eye level, and it had been vacant for three years. Mahogany and oak beams are set in the living and dining room ceilings, and both rooms have considerable wainscoting and molding. A solid oak stairway with a detailed, carved banister and love seat leads to the second floor. Green tiles decorate the living room fireplace.



3707 Harrison Boulevard

3707 Harrison Boulevard

Clarence E. Shepard of Shepard, Farrar, and Wiser designed and built this house in 1910. At the time, Mr. Shepard focused his architectural talents on an area bounded by Troost and Roanoke, south of Armour Boulevard. He later designed some 600 homes west of Ward Parkway and throughout the Mission Hills districts. This house is unique even among Mr. Shepard’s designs. The exterior walls of native limestone average 2 1/2-feet thick. To complete his design, the huge slabs of stone under each front window and over the massive living room fireplace had to be imported form Carthage, Missouri, by mule train. Extra thick plaster and supporting brick interior walls, creating a structure as durable as its massive appearance, complement the stone foundation and exterior walls. Instead of the usual 2 x 6 floors joists of many older homes, Shepard used 3 x 10’s and 10” steel I-beams for floor support. The house was originally known as the J.V. Kendall residence, after its first owner.



3804 Harrison Boulevard

3804 Harrison Street

Once divided into five apartments, this two and one-half story stucco home built in 1902 is distinguished by a long horizontal dormer extending over a large front porch supported by stone columns. Eighteen months of intensive renovation has taken this typical Hyde Park residence on a remarkable journey from the ordinary to the exceptional. Original to the house are the stunning double beveled glass front doors and the green tiled fireplace in the parlor with its oak mantel and beveled glass bookcases.



3820 Harrison Boulevard

3820 Harrison Street

Designed by noted Kansas City architect Edgar Madorie, this two and on half story stone and shingle home was built in 1908 for Reverend Samuel M. Neel. Reverend Neel was the pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church, then located at 9th and Harrison. He retired as pastor in 1912 having served in that position since 1888. Reverend Neel’s interesting past included service with a Tennessee-based regiment during the Civil War and training at the university of Oxford, Mississippi in the field of law, after which he followed the call to the ministry in 1875. Central was the third church at which Dr. Neel served as pastor. At retirement, the popular minister was seventy years old, but continued to work on behalf of the Presbyterian Church until his death in the early 1920s.

The house served as a home and office for osteopath Rose Dalton for about twenty years, during which time a small fire occurred in December 1944. Perhaps this explains the next owner: Kansas City fire fighter Joseph Byrnes and his family! Eventually the home was subdivided and occupied by two families.

Walking through the beveled leaded glass front door into a spacious entry hall and continuing through the columns that mark the entry into the large living room, one is aware of the style and symmetry of this classic home. The library alcove at the north end of the living room features matching leaded glass windows and cabinet doors along with an original fireplace. An elegant dining room, with a box-beam ceiling leads to the new kitchen. The second floor contains another fireplace and bay window.



3828 Harrison Street

3828 Harrison Boulevard

This classic example of a midwestern “Shirtwaist” house was built for a prominent Kansas City attorney around 1907. The house features leaded glass, pocket doors, curved walls, dining room plate rack, and a side carriage door with stained glass. Restoration began in 1976. Three kitchens, two baths, and tons of debris left form countless tenants, who had occupied the house during its decades as a rooming house, were removed. New missing features include hallway chair rail and wainscot; decorative cornice molding in the living room; and brass ceiling light fixtures to replace existing bare light bulbs. The dining room plate rack, which had been removed in the 1940’s when the room was a bedroom, was restored.



3839 Harrison Street

3839 Harrison Street

J.W. McCary built this three-story brick, stucco, and cedar single house for speculation in 1909. The craftsman style has Tudor details. To return the house to its original exterior appearance, asphalt shingles were pulled off, and the stucco and half timbers were replaced. The buckling brick on the first floor was removed and reassembled with tinted mortar. The home was gutted to the rafters and studs, with the oak woodwork and brass fixtures removed for restoration.



3900 Harrison Street

3900 Harrison Street

This home was built in 1905 and had been converted into a duplex. It has been restored back as a single-family residence.



3916 Harrison Street

3916 Harrison Street

Once the eyesore on the block, this pure Kansas City Shirtwaist had been the victim of a major fire and vacant for about a year before being salvaged. Built in 1906 by William J. Dawson, a contractor who lived nearby, the home was owned until the mid-1940’s by William E. and Ida Murphy. From the 1940’s on, it was owned by a succession of others, one of who divided it into two apartments. The brick lower level of the house is topped by horizontal lap siding, with the top half-story faced in stucco. Asbestos shingles had coved the upper levels of the exterior at one time.



4020 Harrison Street

4020 Harrison Street

The half brick half stucco duplex was built in the mid-1930’s. The façade is dominated by a partial-width two-story porch, which is covered by a hip roof. Brick piers at ground level and wood columns at the second-story support the porch roof.



4246 Harrison Street

4246 Harrison Street

Built in 1906, the first resident of this large brick house was Richard McCartney, a broker of hides at the stockyards. He lived here for 20 years. After Mr. McCartney’s death, as with many residences during the depression the house fell vacant for many years. In 1946, it was converted into six apartments. Oak beams span both dining and living rooms. There’s a magnificent Palladian window on the north wall of the landing and a complementing one to the south.



4310 Harrison Street

4310 Harrison Street

The bi-level entry hall of this modified shirtwaist features columns and an arch leading to the staircase. An oak box beam ceiling in the dining room, egg and dart molding and green tile fireplace in the living room are some of the other original architectural features of this unique home.

Architect Frank Graves for his widowed mother Letitia built the stone and shingle residence in 1908. The Graves did not reside in the house very long; following the death of his mother in 1912, Mr. Graves sold the house to Lucian and Emma Rosenwald. The Rosenwalds lived in the house for over thirty-five years and raised two children here, Robert and Eliase. Robert practiced law in Kansas City for over fifty years; his sister Elise married in 1934 and moved to St. Louis. After the death of his wife, Lucian Rosenwald continued to live in the house until he died in the late 1950s. Although the house changed hands more often during the 1960s and 1970s, and was even the dormitory building for a multi-house commune located on the block, it was never subdivided into apartments.

The central hall plan home features a living room, dining room, and kitchen on the first floor. The butler’s pantry was removed to enlarge the kitchen and the box beams were added to the ceiling. The second floor features three bedrooms, an upstairs den, bath, fireplace, built-in hall cabinet and sleeping porch.



4324 Harrison Street

4324 Harrison Street

James J. Squier is perhaps best known today for the land he owned on the east side of Troost where a neighborhood, Squire Park, bears his name. However, Mr. Squier also owned forty acres of land west of Troost and south of 43rd Street. He sold the land to William Gaskin in 1902 who immediately platted the area for residential development and called it Sunny Slope. Developers were required to build homes costing at least $3,000 in the Sunny Slope plat.

Ignacio B. Koch, a sales agent for the American Lumber Company, was the first owner of this 1907 Colonial Revival style house. The house cost $4,000. However, it was the Drake family who called this address home for more than thirty-five years. Anna Drake, window of physician Nelson A. Drake, moved into the house with her two daughters, Della and Nina, in the early 1920s. Both of the daughters were teachers at Manual High School where they continued to teach until they retired in the mid-1940s. At one point, members of the Drake family also occupied the house to the north.

The two and one half story home features a stone exterior on the first floor and clapboards on the second. Fluted columns accent the corners of the second floor. The front door, framed by leaded glass sidelights, leads into a large entry hall with a green tiled fireplace. The unusual woodwork, with its curved shape, is found throughout the first floor. Pocket doors, faced with oak on one side and cherry on the other, separate the living room form the dining room.



4332 Harrison Street

4332 Harrison Street

Built for physician George B. Norberg in 1907 by builder E.M. Baker, this two and one half story shirtwaist has served as a single-family home for most of its existence. Although Dr. Norberg lived in the home for only six years before moving to W. 53rd Terrace, the next two owners occupied the house for fifty years, each for about twenty-five years. The house was subdivided into two apartments in the mid-1970s and converted back to a single-family home about ten years later. Drop ceilings, plywood paneling and wall-to-wall carpeting had to be removed. However, the woodwork on the first floor had never been painted and three matching leaded glass windows in the living room, entry hall and stair landing were still here.



4417 Harrison Street

4417 Harrison Street

When this shirtwaist style house was built in 1907, the first owners paid $4,000 for it. That was after a 1905 city ruling for the subdivision stated all homes in Sunny Slope had to be at least two stories and cost no less than $3,000. The house had been used for apartments but the outstanding woodwork and hardwood floors were still in tact as well as some of the original light fixtures, which had been converted from gas. A wrap-around porch enhances the home’s appeal. lt;/blockquote>



4433 Harrison Street

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The Sunny Slope subdivision was platted by William Gaskin for residential development in 1902 on land located west of Troost and south of 43rd Street. Developers in the subdivision were required to build homes of at least two stories with a minimum cost of $3,000. The sunny slope plat was located on land previously owned by James J. Squier, for whom the neighborhood east of Hyde Park, Squire Park, is named.

Construction of this house began in April 1909 and it was ready for occupancy by the end of the year. Early residents of 4433 Harrison included the A. T. Hastings family and Edward Parrott. The owner with the longest tenure was Josephine Sophie Sterbenz, who lived here from about 1927 to 1947. Mrs. Sterbenz, who immigrated to the United States from Austria, was a widow when she bought this shirtwaist style home. Prior to her move to this house, she and her husband, Peter, had operated a grocery in Kansas City, Kansas. As was typical at the time, Mrs. Sterbenz rented out the rooms on the second floor while she lived on the first. Her tenants had no access to cooking facilities. Of special note in this house is the diamond shaped design featured in the upper sash of the double hung windows on both the first and second floor; this same pattern is replicated in the front door and in the oak beamed ceiling in the dining room.



4439 Harrison Street

4439 Harrison Street

This shirtwaist was built around 1909 on speculation. Like many of the homes throughout Hyde Park, 4439 Harrison was broken into apartments after World War II to address the housing shortage. Many of the original features of the house were lost over the years, but some remain, such as the second floor hallway built-in. In was probably during this time as well that the “newer” shingles were added to the exterior of the second and third floors to cover up the original cedar shingles or clapboards.