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3300 Campbell Street

3300 Campbell Street

This house was built in 1905 for John L. Hall, a railroad conductor. The house is a Kansas City shirtwaist. In 1915, Mr. Hall had the house remodeled into three apartments. A second entrance was added to the front porch and a stairwell was added to the north side of the building. Mr. Hall shared the house for a time with a grocery man and a traveling salesman, but moved away in the early 1920s.



3305 Campbell Street

3305 Campbell Street

Built in 1907, this typical Kansas City shirtwaist was designed with a traditional 2 1/2-story floor, four-bedroom interior. The house was gutted to the original studs and recreated in an eclectic style.



3308 Campbell Street

3308 Campbell Street

Like many houses in Hyde Park, this house had been subdivided into four apartments and suffered the removal of original fixtures as well as the closing off of fireplaces. Restoration included rebuilding original walls and specially milled woodwork.



3312 Campbell Street

3312 Campbell Street

This 2 1/2-story house was built n 1897 for the real estate broker William Leitch, as was 3308 Campbell. At varying times the Leitch family lived in each of the houses. In 1918, Mr. Leitch, then a widower, sold the residence, and until 1979 the house passed through numerous owners and was used as a rooming house much of the time. The residence has been restored in the “Queen Anne” style. A variety of surface textures have been achieved through the use of several different types of shingles, the numerous window shapes including the round window in the third floor, the three dimensional ornamentation, including spindles, along the upper section of the porch and the two-story bay on the north façade. Slated for demolition, the vandalized and burned-out house was renovated by a Kansas City firm.



3316 Campbell Street

3316 Campbell Street

This 1903 house typifies the styling and floor plan of turn-of-the-century shirtwaist homes. During the mid-1950’s, the house was converted into five apartments with a sixth apartment fashioned out of the original garage. In 1983, the house was found to be in violation of zoning ordinances, and four of the six apartments had to be eliminated. Shortly thereafter, a small fire in the second floor caused damage. The oak window seat, pocket doors and trim had to be recreated.



3319 Campbell Street

3319 Campbell Street

Cowherd Co. built his “Shirtwaist” style house, like its neighbor 3323, for speculation. It appears that it was not occupied until 1904. At that time the Assistant City Counselor, Francis M. Hayward, and his wife purchased the house. Mr. Hayward died in 1924, but Mrs. Hayward remained in the house until 1933. Exterior architectural features of note are the bellcast gable dormer, steeply pitched hip roof, brick first floor and clapboard second story and the decorative oriel supported by large brackets on the north side of the house. Before restoration that started in 1979 the house contained seven apartments. The fireplace had to be reopened and asbestos shingle siding removed. A gingerbread style archway spans the central hall. Originally from a house in Connecticut, the restorer bought it from an architectural salvage company in Kansas City.



3323 Campbell Street

3323 Campbell Street

The Cowherd Real Estate Co. constructed this 2 1/2-story residence in 1901 for insurance underwriter, Willis C. Tabb. In 1920 the Tabb family sold the residence to Clara E. Goode who used the structure as a “home offering furnished rooms to renter of good reputation.” This house was sold again after World War II and until 1970s it passed through 9 owners, many of whom used it as a rooming house. The architecture of this house contains elements of several styles. The “Shirtwaist” style with stone first floor and shingle second. A bellcast gable, one of the most distinctive gestures of “Shirtwaist” style is also seen here. The house also displays elements of the “Queen Anne” and Colonial Revival. A notable example of the latter style is the balustrade on the second story porch. Another outstanding feature is the decorative bay on the north side of the home containing a rounded arch leaded glass window. Restoration began in 1980.



3326 Campbell Street

3326 Campbell Street

This stone and clapboard two and a half story house was designed by the well-known architect John McKecknie and built in 1900. The earliest known resident was Charles Lathrop, a grain merchant, in1902. Successive owners have left the home relatively intact (a second floor sleeping porch was added in 1913) as a single-family dwelling.

Of note are the original windows with their distinctive diagonal mullions and the cascading ribbon motif on the front second floor exterior. Prior to restoration the roof had been allowed to deteriorate to the point of collapse and there had been considerable water damage.



3335 Campbell Street

3335 Campbell Street

When the house was purchased in 1993 it was divided into four badly maintained apartments, covered with asbestos siding and had strange room additions projecting form the exterior walls. The house was built in 1909 for $3,500 by real estate developer J.W. McKamey. The first owner was Abraham Sheuerman, co-owner of the Kansas City Pants and Skirt Company at 7th and Broadway. Like numerous large Hyde Park homes, the house was turned into apartments after World War II.



3416 Campbell Street

3416 Campbell Street

This American Foursquare house was built at a cost of $3,500 in 1903 for Dr. Campbell. The street where the house sits was named after his father, and Charlotte Street, one block west, was named after his mother. The Campbell farm used to site on the street and since the mother worked in the back, she posted a sign, “Charlotte’ so her friends would know where to find her. The sign remained and the street was named. Interestingly, after receiving his medical training, Dr. Campbell thought he looked too young to be a doctor, so he went into the newspaper business for several years before returning to medicine—this time with a few gray hairs. The dining and living room light fixtures are from France.



3417 Campbell Street

3417 Campbell Street

Realtor J.W. McKamey built this shirtwaist style house (and its almost identical twin to the south at 3419 Campbell) during the winter of 1902-1903. David M. Edwards, a builder/contractor, moved into the house with his wife in May 1903. In the mid-1970s, the owner of 3419 Campbell purchased this house and for the next fifteen years it served as a rental property and/or storage facility. Although never subdivided into apartments, the house suffered from neglect and outdated décor. Four layers of wallpaper and seven layers of paint on oak woodwork were removed in the living room. The original stone fireplace was replaced with green tile surround and white mantle.



3436 Campbell Street

3436 Campbell Street

Only a few years after his arrival in Kansas City, general contractor George Goodlander and his wife Laura built this large, two and one half story brick Victorian style home in 1899. The Goodlanders shared the home with John and Jennie Tuttle from the beginning and in fact, Laura Goodlander and Jennie Tuttle lived in the house until the late 1940s. The house remained a single family dwelling for the next decade, but by the early 1960s had been converted into five apartments, including one in the basement.

The house contains double entry door with beveled glass, tile floor in the vestibule, box beam ceilings in both parlors and the dining room, fireplace tile and mantel in the middle parlor, and built-in china cabinet with leaded glass doors in the dining room. The dining room woodwork is an excellent example of graining, a faux finish popular in Victorian times in which common wood was painted to achieve the look of more expensive wood. There is an unusual angled window on the stair landing and the octagonal ceiling inset over the stairs, second floor fireplace and east, third floor Palladian window.



3440 Campbell Street

3440 Campbell Street

This house was part of the expansion of homes to the south of the city in the late 1880’s. In general, as you progress south in Hyde Park, the homes are newer. This house was built in 1899 for Dr. and Mrs. Frank Askew. Farrow Architects, who also designed 54 Janssen Place, designed the home.



3611 Campbell Street

3611 Campbell Street

Built in 1910 for the Newby family, this Kansas City shirtwaist was converted to three apartments after World War II, when Kansas City suffered a housing shortage. The house features a curved, cut stone porch, second floor bay window, and a natural oak entry and double staircase. The oak fireplace is distinctive.



3615 Campbell Street

3615 Campbell Street

Henrietta Goldman and her son would be proud today to acknowledge the home they lived in from the horse and buggy era until the Second World War. Built in 1910, this classic Kansas City shirtwaist house tells the familiar Hyde Park story of a single-family home converted to three individual apartments, and back to single family home.

The conversion to a multi-apartment structure in the 40s resulted n the loss of many of the original architectural features including light fixtures, a colonnade between the foyer and living room, and the living room fireplace. All that remained from the homes’ former splendor were its beautiful beveled glass windows and sitting room fireplace with built-in stained glass cabinets over the mantel.



3625 Campbell Street

3625 Campbell Street

Built in 1905, by the R.M. Clark Company, this American Foursquare house was first owned by Joseph Fritton, a creditman for the Ridenour Baker Grocery Company. During its 80-year life, the home has had only five owners, and unlike most Hyde Park homes, it was never divided into apartments. The house has all the original hardware and light fixtures and a unique, vestibule-type door.



3640 Campbell Street

3640 Campbell Street

The modified shirtwaist style home was built n 1907 and includes a private drive with a charming old carriage house. Individual characteristics include enchanting French doors, leaded glass, pocket doors and diagonally mullioned windows. Beamed ceilings in the main dining room add more distinction to the home and an unusual summer dining room features oak built-in cabinets and a marble topped window seat. All fireplaces are original and so is the extensive tile in the bathrooms.



3654 Campbell Street

3654 Campbell Street

Built in 1907, this two and one-half story frame and stone home was first occupied by Mrs. Ella Dayton and sons Charles, Milon, and Ralph. The Daytons moved south to 3743 Campbell after only three years. Jay W. Sheidley was the next resident of note. One of six heirs to the Sheidley fortune, Jay moved to Kansas City from Chicago in 1911 following the death of his aunt, Sarah Sheidley. The Sheidley family (Sarah and three brothers) had come to Kansas City from Ohio after the Civil War and operated a cattle business, investing their profits in downtown real estate. The best known of their properties was the Sheidley Building, constructed in 1888 at 9th and Main.

Jay Sheidley added the second floor sleeping porch and the garage to the property in 1913 and lived at this address until about 1930. The next two-plus decades saw a parade of residents, but one thing remained consistent—someone who lived in the house was affiliated with the Shepard Stationery Company.

Architectural features abound in this large and gracious home, starting at the front door with beveled, leaded glass sidelights. Inside, directly opposite the front door, an oak colonnade leads to the main staircase. The large living room features an oak fireplace mantel and an ornate ceiling molding; the dining room includes a box beam ceiling and access to the round porch on the south side of the house.



3655 Campbell Street

3655 Campbell Street

When this splendid house was designed by architect Edgar Madorie in 1909, he incorporated 60 windows in such a marvelous way that an article ran in The Kansas City Star on March 9, 1909. “Sun at any angle will be able to pour a whole broadside of glittering beams into the house.” The house was built for R.F. Crawford who was then local manager for the Emerson Newton Implement Co. It’s cost of $11,000 was a considerable sum in 1909. The second floor held three bedrooms and a living room. The third floor had a ballroom and two servant’s bedrooms with a billiards room in the basement. The house changed hands frequently from the mid 1920s and by 1965 it was broken into five apartments. After restoration in the 1980s the house was the cover story of Metropolitan Home in February 1991.



3800 Campbell Street

3800 Campbell Street

When this house was purchased in 1975 the owners little realized the gem they had acquired. In the 1950’s the house was converted to five apartments, and the most recent occupants had been the state headquarters of a national religious sect. That group built a “chapel” on the front porch blocking the front door. They also maintained a dormitory on the second floor, offices on the first floor and a candle factory in the basement. While research it’s history, the new owners discovered that the house had been built in 1907 as the show home for the new Neosho Subdivision. The design, by architects Wilder & Wright,is classic Prairie School architecture, which marked a radical departure from the dominant styles of that era. Characteristic elements are long, low straight lines, flat roofs, lack of exterior ornamentation, and the greater use of glass, in this case 66 windows and 11 glass doors. Four rooms have been added to the original eight by enclosing open-air porches. The many sconces are original and all the woodwork including living room ceiling beams are quarter-cut oak. The fireplace in the living room contains highly unusual Rookwood tiles in shades of red and brown, no two of which are the same. Previous occupants walled in and floored over the main stairway, which was reopened.



3809 Campbell Street

3809 Campbell Street

This two and one half story shirtwaist was built in 1908 for Tillingham Howard Sanford, the Jackson County Deputy Assessor and a real estate investor. This was Mr. Sanford’s second Hyde Park home; his first was 3621 Charlotte where he and his family lived from 1903 through 1908. The Sanfords lived in this house until 1920 and it remained a single family home until the 1940s. The house is an excellent example of the shirtwaist style with a stone first floor and clapboard second floor. The exterior includes Tudor-influenced half timbering on the third floor, brackets under the porch eaves, bay window, and third floor dormer. Inside the house is approximately 3,000 square feet of living space with six bedrooms, three bathrooms and two fireplaces. When the house was purchased in 1986 it had been subdivided into four apartments. Inside, the first floor features a unique multi-level living room and two sets of beveled glass. On the second floor French doors connect the master bedroom with the library.



3828 Campbell Street

3828 Campbell Street

This shirtwaist house was built in 1907 for superintendent William J. Hillyer and his family. The Hillyers lived there until about 1922, when C.M. Fisher purchased the home. About 1927 George and Annie Galvin bought the home and lived there until the early 1950s. This house was never subdivided into apartments, but it had numerous owners and still managed to be kept in tact. The house has some of its original light fixtures and claw foot bathtub. All the woodwork is original and has never been pained.



3937 Campbell Street

3937 Campbell Street

This once “Plain Jane” has a rather sketchy early history. It was built in 1906, possibly for speculation. In 1917 Frederick F. Meiners, a clerk for Wilson & Co. owned it. By 1920, it was the residence of Maud McCann, the widow of James McCann (a fellow who held various jobs from wrapper at the Boston Store to carpenter) and so the history of 3937 goes.



4001 Campbell Street

4001 Campbell Street

This 3,000 square foot residence was constructed in 1901 for C.T. Houlehan for $3,000. Contrasting wall materials, and geometric patterned double-hung windows characterize this common vernacular form of the Prairie style. A wrap-around porch covered by a double-gabled roof supported by stone piers dominates the main façade. The home features a flexible sliding door made of parallel slates similar to a roll-top desk.



4008 Campbell Street

4008 Campbell Street

Most American houses are built in one of the many architectural fashions, or styles, that have been popular over our country’s long history. These changing fashions either incorporate earlier architectural images or completely eschew the past to create modern styles with their own fashionable images. There is, however, another and less familiar type of dwelling that lacks this concern for architectural taste. These folk hoses are built to provide basic shelter with little regard for changing fashion.

There are six distinctive families of house shapes that dominated American folk building through the first half of the 20th century. One of these, the simple gable-front folk house, expanded west with the railroads and became a dominant folk form until well into the 20th century. The house at 4008 Campbell is an excellent example of a styled gable-front folk house. The rubble stone house is narrow, has 2 1/2 stories, and has relatively steep roof pitch. Stylized details on this pre-1900 house include stone quoins at the building edges and stone surrounds at the windows and front door. Interior features include bulls-eye wood trim, reception hall, pocket doors, and two very unusual marbleized fireplaces.



4124 Campbell Street

4124 Campbell Street

It is believed that 4124 Campbell was constructed around 1906. Gould’s 1907 Directory for Kansas City lists George Horn, a lawyer with offices in the Shukert building, as residing here. However, the first water service permit found at City Hall, usually a reliable indicator of when Kansas City houses were built, is dated in 1916 and shows a Mr. Baker as owner. Directories from 1910s through the 1930s show George Horn and his wife (listed as Eliza L. or Linnie E.) as residing at and owning the house.

The style of the house is American Foursquare with Prairie School influences. The house contains a center hipped roof attic dormer, which matches the hipped roof style of the house. The house has wide flared eaves/soffits with decorative trim. It is nearly identical in style and size, but not material, to its turn-of-the-century neighbors on the south and north. All three houses may have been built by the same builder/developer. The 1955 City Directory indicates that by this time the house was divided into a duplex. By 1959, the house appears to have been further subdivided into perhaps four rental units.



4214 Campbell Street

4214 Campbell Street

The home at 4214 Campbell Street is located in an area, which was platted for development in 1885 called Troost Highlands. Built sometime between 1896 and 1900, is one of the older homes in this part of Hyde Park. The original owners, William and Julia Self, sold it in 1903. Records indicate that the water was first turned on in 1908, so for at least eight years this home functioned like many others of the time—without indoor plumbing and with a well and pump. The house changed hands often between 1903 and 1929 when a tailor who quickly set up a shop in the house purchased it. The history of the home reached its low point in the late 1980’s when incredibly enough, it was a notorious “crack house” and was even featured in a local television report on drugs in Kansas City. Today, it is an excellent example of neighborhood perseverance and hard work. Rehabilitation started in 1990.



4300 Campbell Street

4300 Campbell Street

Forty-three hundred Campbell was built in the summer of 1905 along with its twin to the south at 4304 Campbell. Each of the first two owners of the home lived at this address for over thirty years. Jessie and Anna Runcie owned the home from 1905 to 1940; Jessie was President of the Western Paper Box Company located at 407 Grand. Ray and Margaret Milner lived here from 1941 to 1973. The house is a two-story shirtwaist with Craftsman detail.



4330 Campbell Street

4330 Campbell Street

This 2 1/2-story brick and clapboard residence, constructed in 1905 is a good example of the post-Victorian domestic style architecture called the “American Foursquare.” Some characteristics of this style which can be seen on this residence are: the boxlike shape, a flatness to the exterior, the use of natural material, the bellcast hip roof and dormers with board overhanging eaves and porch extending the full width of the front façade. An entresol window on the north façade breaks up the absolute flatness of the sides, a common element in the basic American Foursquare. When the house was purchased in 1976 it had been converted into four apartments.



4416 Campbell Street

4416 Campbell Street

The Butler-Weaver Real Estate Company built this American Foursquare in 1908 for a cost of $2,500. Unlike most Hyde Park homes, it was never divided into apartments. The wood-burning fireplace is not original but is nestled nicely between original leaded glass windows. The front door is also the original leaded glass. The property contains one of the few natural rock, freestanding carriage houses in Hyde Park. The house still has the carriage bumper guards and its own fireplace.



4433 Campbell Street

4433 Campbell Street

Matt O’Connell for R.B. Williams built this 1908 eclectic residence at a cost of $3,000. The main façade is dominated by a front-overhanging gable with decorative half-timbering which was constructed in 1918 following a fire which destroyed the front second floor area. A new roof, sunroom and bedroom were constructed for $600. The fluted columns, stair balustrade, builtin cabinets and beamed ceiling, with egg and dart molding, enhance the interior.